Tomasz Safjański, University of Law and Public Administration Rzeszów–Przemyśl, Poland

 

 

 Identification of the crucial problems of one of the critical institutions of the global security system which has been an element present in police cooperation for over 90 years is not an easy task. The multitude of factors (e.g. political, legal and organisational etc) that shape options for Interpol action makes the identification and assessment of such problems very controversial. The development of international police cooperation within the framework of Interpol was carried out in a logical way and closely linked to the real needs of the police of cooperating countries. Through long-term practice, specific mechanisms and instruments for organising and coordinating international police action have been developed. Certainly the presence of Interpol does not solve all the needs that may be encountered in the practice of police cooperation, but without Interpol, the cooperation discussed could develop only at a regional level, which would considerably reduce the effectiveness of the international search for suspects and criminal information exchange. Police actions undertaken within the framework of Interpol, which is a mechanism of multilateral cooperation, in a natural way can only serve as supportive and complementary to operations in the fight against crime that are carried out in the internal dimension of Member States or as part of bilateral agreements. To such operations Interpol provides coordinating assistance, expert knowledge and scientific or analytical support. At the current stage of development of the legal situation and international relations there is no place for any further Interpol function that might prove effective in practice. Assessing the activities of a well-deserved international organisation, it should be pointed out that there is an undeniable need for Interpol’s existence. Interpol is perceived by the international community as an instrument that can be used only against cross-border criminal threats. Consequently, as an organisation that has operated for decades in terms of a clearly defined role, Interpol has the ability to integrate organisational tasks against these.